Archive | July, 2011

Geek Reading July 31, 2011

I have talked about human filters and my plan for digital curation. These items are the fruits of those ideas, the items I deemed worthy from my Google Reader shares.   Hidden cost of being Google employee No 59 Mango released to carriers, the clock is ticking. Is Microsoft’s marketing in the game? Templates for […]

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Datatype generic programming in Scala – Fixing on Cata

The paper Functional Programming with Overloading and Higher-Order Polymorphism by Mark P Jones discusses recursion and fixpoints in a section Recursion schemes: Functional programming with bananas and lenses with all examples in Haskell. The paper is an excellent read for anyone interested in an overall landscape of functional programming concepts. In case you haven’t read […]

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Shrink Tours: Introverts Rock And Mirror Neurons.

The first thing I do when I visit a large foreign city is … take a Hop-on-hop-off bus. Easy and convenient way to get a guided tour through a new place. So, I wondered, why not do this for the web? Stop 1: Are Introverts More Suited For Virtual Leadership? At Gantthead I wrote recently: […]

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Estimating Non-Functional Requirements

A few weeks back I promised someone I would blog about the unique challenges of estimating non-functional requirements. First, let’s remember that a non-functional requirement is a requirement that is more about the state of being of the system than about one specific thing the system does. Non-functional requirements often have to do with performance, […]

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Happy Birthday. Four Years The Project Shrink Blog.

Today The Project Shrink is four years old. On July 15th 2007 I created this blog and called it “Project Shrink”, because I wanted to emphasize “human behavior” in projects and I have difficulty pronouncing “Project Sociologist”. I have been writing about Project Management online since 2001. In the summer of 2007 I decided to […]

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When Do You Say A Development Task Is Really Done?

I love when other people write a blog post at the same time you are struggling with the problem that they describe. Today’s timely post comes from Michael Bolton on his DevelopSense blog. In “The Undefinition of Done”, Michael talks about the fact that people typically have different definitions: One issue,  as I’ve pointed out […]

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Balance the System First

Let’s say you are a company that builds an enterprise class software product, one that in general is pretty standard, but always seems to require some degree of customization… or maybe a new feature (or two) to get the big deal closed. Your product is much better than the competition, and has always been extremely […]

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Composing Heterogeneous DSLs in Scala

When we use DSLs to model business rules, we tend to use quite a few of them together. We may use a DSL for computing date/time, another one for manipulating money with currency, and a few others for implementing the actual rules of the domain. And not all of them will be developed by us […]

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How to Escape Trivia Enslavement

“What are you planning on doing today?”  That’s one of the key three questions you must answer during a daily Scrum meeting.  And it’s the topic of the first Pomodoro of the day, if you use the Pomodoro technique. No big deal, it’s just asking you to think about a goal or set of goals […]

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