Archive | November, 2010

Rite Of Passage Or Useless Time Suck

How do you welcome new employees? Normally, it is a rite of passage that all new developers must search some documentation and struggle with setting up their development environment. Let me state for the record that I absolutely hate this concept. I understand the need for understanding the environment you are working in, but you […]

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Running On Autopilot Or Being Mindful. The Stress-Energy Paradox

Sometimes you shift to automatic pilot. When your brain is tired, you react instantly to information. Every stimulus gets a fast and automatic response. Fear locks your brain too. “Our people, good. Other people, bad.” “Mac, good. Windows, bad.” “Same, good. Different, bad.” This “automatic pilot” is based upon our mental model that happens to […]

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How to Know if Scrum Is Right for Your Project

After years of studying the problem, I’ve come up with a foolproof way to determine if Scrum is right for a given project. Here it is: Pick a number from 1 – 9. Multiply by 3. Add 3, then multiply by 3 again. You will get your answer by adding the two digits together and […]

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The Problems with Estimating Business Value

I occasionally see teams that want to put an estimate of “business value” on each user story. They usually do this for either or both of two reasons: to be able to measure the amount of “business value” delivered to the organization, usually graphing this sprint by sprint to be able to prioritize user stories […]

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It’s Effort, Not Complexity

A client asked me last week “When will my team be done with this project?” This is probably the bazillionth time I’ve been asked that question in one way or another. I have never once been asked, “How hard will my team have to think to develop this project?” Clients, bosses, customers, and stakeholders care […]

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How Do You Get from Here to Agile? Iterate.

The effort of adopting Scrum is best managed using Scrum itself. With its iterative nature, fixed timeboxes, and emphasis on teamwork and action, it seems best suited to manage the enormous project of becoming and then growing agile with Scrum.

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